Table of Contents
ISRN Anesthesiology
Volume 2011, Article ID 685758, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/685758
Research Article

Sevoflurane Induction Shortens the Onset of Vecuronium at the Corrugator Supercilii Muscles: A Randomized Comparison with Propofol Induction

Department of Anesthesiology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka 814-0180, Japan

Received 29 September 2011; Accepted 17 October 2011

Academic Editors: S. Baris, J.-H. Baumert, and D. E. Raines

Copyright © 2011 Keiichi Nitahara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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