Table of Contents
ISRN Otolaryngology
Volume 2011, Article ID 703936, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/703936
Research Article

Patient Compliance during 24-Hour Dual pH Probe Monitoring for Extraesophageal Reflux

1Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 670394, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
2Department of Molecular and Cell Physiology, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 670576, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA

Received 17 August 2011; Accepted 28 September 2011

Academic Editor: C. Canova

Copyright © 2011 Joy Musser et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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