Table of Contents
ISRN Nursing
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 735936, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/735936
Research Article

Psychosocial Health Status of Persons Seeking Treatment for Exposure to Libby Amphibole Asbestos

1College of Nursing, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173560, Bozeman, MT 59717-3560, USA
2College of Nursing, Montana State University, 32 Campus Drive no. 7416, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
3Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar and College of Nursing, Montana State University, 32 Campus Drive no. 7416, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
4Center for Asbestos Related Disease, 214 E 3rd Street, Libby, MT 59923, USA

Received 13 February 2011; Accepted 30 March 2011

Academic Editors: N. Jarrett and H. S. Shin

Copyright © 2011 Clarann Weinert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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