Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 780540, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/780540
Research Article

Effect of Tannin-Binding Agents (Polyethylene Glycol and Polyvinylpyrrolidone) Supplementation on In Vitro Gas Production Kinetics of Some Grape Yield Byproducts

Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664, Iran

Received 8 November 2011; Accepted 4 December 2011

Academic Editor: D. Barnard

Copyright © 2011 Maghsoud Besharati and Akbar Taghizadeh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. M. Besharati, A. Taghizadeh, J. Hossein, and M. G. Ali, “Evaluation of some by-products using in situ and in vitro gas production techniques,” American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 7–12, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. M. Besharati and A. Taghizadeh, “Evaluation of dried grape by-product as a tanniniferous tropical feedstuff,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 152, no. 3-4, pp. 198–203, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. P. S. Makkar, “Effects and fate of tannins in ruminant animals, adaptation to tannins, and strategies to overcome detrimental effects of feeding tannin-rich feeds,” Small Ruminant Research, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 241–256, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. H. P. S. Makkar, M. Blummel, and K. Becker, “Formation of complexes between polyvinyl pyrrolidones or polyethylene glycols and tannins, and their implication in gas production and true digestibility in in vitro techniques,” British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 73, no. 6, pp. 897–913, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. G. Getachew, H. P. S. Makkar, and K. Becker, “Effect of polyethylene glycol on in vitro degradability of nitrogen and microbial protein synthesis from tannin-rich browse and herbaceous legumes,” British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 73–83, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. H. Abel and H. Icking, “Feeding value of dried grape pomace for ruminants,” Landwirtschaftliche Forschung, vol. 37, pp. 44–52, 1984. View at Google Scholar
  7. T. Baumgärtel, H. Kluth, K. Epperlein, and M. Rodehutscord, “A note on digestibility and energy value for sheep of different grape pomace,” Small Ruminant Research, vol. 67, no. 2-3, pp. 302–306, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. Y. Lu and L. Yeap Foo, “The polyphenol constituents of grape pomace,” Food Chemistry, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 1–8, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. J. D. Reed, “Nutritional toxicology of tannins and related polyphenols in forage legumes,” Journal of Animal Science, vol. 73, no. 5, pp. 1516–1528, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. C. S. McSweeney, B. Palmer, D. M. McNeill, and D. O. Krause, “Microbial interactions with tannins: nutritional consequences for ruminants,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 91, no. 1-2, pp. 83–93, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. AOAC, Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC international, AOAC international, Maryland, Md, USA, 1999.
  12. P. J. Van Soest, J. B. Robertson, and B. A. Lewis, “Methods for dietary fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and nonstarch polysaccharides in relation to animal nutrition,” Journal of Dairy Science, vol. 74, no. 10, pp. 3583–3597, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. H. P. S. Makkar, Quantification of Tannins in Tree Foliage. A Laboratory Manual for the FAO/IAEA Co-Ordinated Research Project on Use of Nuclear and Related techniques to Develop Simple Tannin Assays for Predicting and Improving the Safety and Efficiency of Feeding Ruminants on Tanniniferous Tree Foliage, Joint FAO/IAEA, FAO/IAEA of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Animal Production and Health Sub-Programme, FAO/IAEA Working Document, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, 2000.
  14. P. M. Fedorak and S. E. Hrudey, “A simple apparatus for measuring gas production by methanogenic cultures in serum bottles,” Environmental Technology Letters, vol. 4, no. 10, pp. 425–432, 1983. View at Google Scholar
  15. E. McDougall, “The composition and output of sheep in salvia,” Biochemical Journal, vol. 43, pp. 99–109, 1948. View at Google Scholar
  16. K. H. Menke, L. Raab, A. Salewski, H. Steingass, D. Fritz, and W. Schneider, “The estimation of the digestibility and metabolisable energy content of ruminant feedingstuffs from the gas production when they are incubated with rumen liquor in vitro,” The Journal of Agricultural Science, vol. 93, no. 1, pp. 217–222, 1979. View at Google Scholar
  17. SAS, Sas User’s Guide: Statistics, Statistical Analysis Systems Institute, Cary, NC, USA, 2002.
  18. D. Alipour and Y. Rouzbehan, “Effects of ensiling grape pomace and addition of polyethylene glycol on in vitro gas production and microbial biomass yield,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 137, no. 1-2, pp. 138–149, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. G. Getachew, H. P. S. Makkar, and K. Becker, “Method of polyethylene glycol application to tannin-containing browses to improve microbial fermentation and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis from tannin-containing browses,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 92, no. 1-2, pp. 51–57, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. G. Getachew, G. M. Crovetto, M. Fondevila et al., “Laboratory variation of 24 h in vitro gas production and estimated metabolizable energy values of ruminant feeds,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 102, no. 1–4, pp. 169–180, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. T. Seresinhe and C. Iben, “in vitro quality assessment of two tropical shrub legumes in relation to their extractable tannins contents,” Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, vol. 87, no. 3-4, pp. 109–115, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. B. Singh, A. Sahoo, R. Sharma, and T. K. Bhat, “Effect of polethylene glycol on gas production parameters and nitrogen disappearance of some tree forages,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 123-124, pp. 351–364, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. R. Kumar and M. Singh, “Tannins: their adverse role in ruminant nutrition,” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 447–453, 1984. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. V. L. Singleton, “Naturally occurring food toxicants: phenolic substances of plant origin common in foods,” Advances in Food Research, vol. 27, no. C, pp. 149–242, 1981. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. O. P. Lohan, D. Lall, J. Vaid, and S. S. Negi, “Utilization of oak tree fodder in cattle ration and fate of oak leaf tannins in the ruminant system,” Indian Journal of Animal Sciences, vol. 53, pp. 1057–1063, 1983. View at Google Scholar
  26. T. N. Barry and S. J. Duncan, “The role of condensed tannins in the nutritional value of Lotus pedunculatus for sheep. I. Voluntary intake,” British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 485–491, 1984. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. H. P. S. Makkar, B. Singh, and S. S. Negi, “Relationship of rumen degradability with microbial colonization, cell wall constituents and tannin levels in some tree leaves,” Journal of Animal Production, vol. 49, pp. 299–303, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  28. A. E. Hagerman, C. T. Robbins, Y. Weerasuriya, T. C. Wilson, and C. McArthur, “Tannin chemistry in relation to digestion,” The Journal of Range Management, vol. 45, pp. 57–62, 1992. View at Google Scholar
  29. D. M. McNeill, M. Komolong, N. Gobiun, and D. Barber, “Influence of dietary condensed tannins on microbial CP supply in sheep,” in Tannins in Livestock and Human Nutrition, J. D. Brooker, Ed., pp. 57–61, ACIAR Proceedings no. 92, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  30. G. C. Waghorn, I. D. Shelton, W. C. McNabb, and S. N. McCutcheon, “Effects of condensed tannins in Lotus pedunculatus on its nutritive value for sheep. 2.Nitrogenous aspects,” Journal of Agricultural Science, vol. 123, no. 1, pp. 109–119, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. G. C. Waghorn and I. D. Shelton, “Effect of condensed tannins in Lotus pedunculatus on the nutritive value of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) fed to sheep,” Journal of Agricultural Science, vol. 125, no. 2, pp. 291–297, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. T. N. Barry, T. R. Manley, and S. J. Duncan, “The role of condensed tannins in the nutritional value of Lotus pedunculatus for sheep.4. Site of carbohydrate and protein digestion as influenced by dietary reactive tannin concentration,” British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 123–137, 1986. View at Google Scholar
  33. C. S. McSweeney, B. Palmer, R. Bunch, and D. O. Krause, “in vitro quality assessment of tannin-containing tropical shrub legumes: protein and fibre digestion,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 82, no. 3-4, pp. 227–241, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. P. Schofield, D. M. Mbugua, and A. N. Pell, “Analysis of condensed tannins: a review,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 91, no. 1-2, pp. 21–40, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. P. Frutos, G. Hervás, F. J. Giráldez, and A. R. Mantecón, “An in vitro study on the ability of polyethylene glycol to inhibit the effect of quebracho tannins and tannic acid on rumen fermentation in sheep, goats, cows, and deer,” Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, vol. 55, no. 11, Article ID AR04058, pp. 1125–1132, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. P. M. Guimarães-Beelen, T. T. Berchielli, R. Beelen, and A. N. Medeiros, “Influence of condensed tannins from Brazilian semi-arid legumes on ruminal degradability, microbial colonization and ruminal enzymatic activity in Saanen goats,” Small Ruminant Research, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 35–44, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. O. Canbolat, A. Kamalak, E. Ozkose, C. O. Ozkan, M. Sahin, and P. Karabay, “Effect of polyethylene glycol on in vitro gas production, metobolizable energy and organic matter digestibility of Quercus cerris leaves,” Livestock Research for Rural Development, vol. 17, no. 4, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  38. C. D. K. Rubanza, M. N. Shem, R. Otsyina, S. S. Bakengesa, T. Ichinohe, and T. Fujihara, “Polyphenolics and tannins effect on in vitro digestibility of selected Acacia species leaves,” Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 119, no. 1-2, pp. 129–142, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. C. D. K. Rubanza, M. N. Shem, R. Otsyina, T. Ichinohe, and T. Fujihara, “Nutritive evaluation of some browse tree legume foliages native to semi-arid areas in western Tanzania,” Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences, vol. 16, no. 10, pp. 1429–1437, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. M. Stienezen, G. C. Waghorn, and G. B. Douglas, “Digestibility and effects of condensed tannins on digestion of sulla (Hedysarum coronarium) when fed to sheep,” New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 215–221, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. A. Priolo, G. C. Waghorn, M. Lanza, L. Biondi, and P. Pennisi, “Polyethylene glycol as a means for reducing the impact of condensed tannins in carob pulp: effects on lamb growth performance and meat quality,” Journal of Animal Science, vol. 78, no. 4, pp. 810–816, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus