Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2011, Article ID 847980, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/847980
Research Article

Studies on Wound Healing Activity of Heliotropium indicum Linn. Leaves on Rats

1Institute of Pharmacy and Technology, Salipur, Cuttack District, Odisha 754202, India
2Royal College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Andha Pasara Road, Berhampur, Odisha 760002, India

Received 15 January 2011; Accepted 24 February 2011

Academic Editor: F. J. Miranda

Copyright © 2011 G. K. Dash and P. N. Murthy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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