Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 858647, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/858647
Research Article

Carcinomas of Distal Fallopian Tube and Their Association with Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinoma: Do They Share a Common “Precursor” Lesion? Loss of Heterozygosity and Immunohistochemical Analysis Using PAX 2, WT-1, and P53 Markers

1Department of Pathology, Magee Womens Hospital of UPMC, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee Womens Hospital of UPMC, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
3Molecular Pathology, Magee Womens Hospital of UPMC, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA

Received 22 September 2010; Accepted 19 October 2010

Academic Editors: W.-F. Cheng, E. Petru, M. T. Sanseverino, and A. Zenclussen

Copyright © 2011 Mamatha Chivukula et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

As the role of distal fallopian tube as organ of serous carcinogenesis is emerging, additional literature on the role of tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (TIC) as a precursor lesion in a subset of primary peritoneal serous carcinomas (PPSC is emerging as well. TIC although fallopian tube in origin can be genetically related to ovarian/peritoneal carcinomas. The role of PAX2 in primary fallopian tube carcinomas (PFTC)/PPSC is yet to be defined. The aim of our study was to understand if the biologic properties of tumors arising in the distal fallopian tube that remain as PFTC are different when they seed on to the peritoneal surface (PPSC). A panel of 6 polymorphic microsatellite markers corresponding to p53, PAX2, and WT1 tumor suppressor genes were studied. Invasive carcinomas as well as TIC arising in the distal fallopian tube when remain as PFTC appears to exhibit different LOH patterns in comparison to PPSC. PAX 2 LOH patterns might represent a “hidden PAX 2 signature” analogous to p53 signatures. PAX 2 might be an emerging marker for detection of early serous carcinomas particularly in BRCA + women.