Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 890850, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/890850
Review Article

Mycorrhizal Interactions for Reforestation: Constraints to Dryland Agroforest in Brazil

1Biology Department, Federal University of Ceará, Campus Pici, Block 902, 60455760 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
2Instituto Spegazzini, Facultad Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CICPBA, Avenida 53 No. 477, B1900AVJ La Plata, Argentina

Received 17 January 2011; Accepted 8 March 2011

Academic Editors: N. Schtickzelle and M. van Noordwijk

Copyright © 2011 Marcela C. Pagano and Marta N. Cabello. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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