Table of Contents
ISRN Education
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 140517, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/140517
Research Article

Clothing and Teacher Credibility: An Application of Expectancy Violations Theory

1Department of Communication, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019-2081, USA
2Department of Communication, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA

Received 6 December 2011; Accepted 26 December 2011

Academic Editors: K. Y. Kuo, S. Lunsford, and G. Sideridis

Copyright © 2012 Norah E. Dunbar and Chris Segrin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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