Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2012, Article ID 167979, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/167979
Research Article

Effects of Prickly Pear Dried Leaves, Artichoke Leaves, Turmeric and Garlic Extracts, and Their Combinations on Preventing Dyslipidemia in Rats

1Department of Pharmacology and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, Petra University, Amman 11196, Jordan
2Delass Natural Products, Naour 11710, Jordan
3Jordanian Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Co. PLC. (JPM), Naour 11710, Jordan

Received 4 April 2012; Accepted 3 May 2012

Academic Editors: G. Biala, H. Cerecetto, G. Edwards, G. Froldi, G. Gervasini, and F. Komada

Copyright © 2012 Nidal A. Qinna et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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