Table of Contents
ISRN Biomathematics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 170594, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/170594
Review Article

Modeling Transport and Flow Regulatory Mechanisms of the Kidney

Department of Mathematics, Duke University, P.O. Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708-0320, USA

Received 17 May 2012; Accepted 12 July 2012

Academic Editors: M. Brumen and J. R. C. Piqueira

Copyright © 2012 Anita T. Layton. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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