Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 170981, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/170981
Research Article

Unusual Effects of Nicotine as a Psychostimulant on Ambulatory Activity in Mice

Biological Imaging and Analysis Section, Center for Environmental Measurement and Analysis, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506, Japan

Received 25 November 2011; Accepted 26 December 2011

Academic Editors: H. Y. Lane and L. D. Reid

Copyright © 2012 Toyoshi Umezu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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