Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2012, Article ID 173792, 30 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/173792
Research Article

Vegetation Productivity/Stability and Other Possible Ecological Invariant Relationships Demonstrated in a Microplot Multispecies Pasture Sward

P.O. Box 115, Lake Tekapo, New Zealand

Received 3 May 2012; Accepted 9 July 2012

Academic Editors: S. Braude and P. Cruz

Copyright © 2012 David Scott. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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