Table of Contents
ISRN Otolaryngology
Volume 2012, Article ID 246065, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/246065
Clinical Study

Vestibular Hearing and Neural Synchronization

1Department of Audiology, School of Rehabilitation, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan 16657-696, Iran
2ENT-Head and Neck Research Center, Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14455-364, Iran

Received 19 December 2011; Accepted 3 January 2012

Academic Editors: S. Kanzaki and M. Sone

Copyright © 2012 Seyede Faranak Emami and Ahmad Daneshi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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