Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2012, Article ID 253809, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/253809
Research Article

Effect of Immunosuppression on Newcastle Disease Virus Persistence in Ducks with Different Immune Status

1Department of Veterinary Pathology, Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 29053-00625, Kangemi, Kenya
2Department of Life Sciences, FSTES, African Council for Distance Education—Technical Committee on Collaboration (ACDE-TCC), Open University of Tanzania, P.O. Box 23409, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Received 30 November 2011; Accepted 4 January 2012

Academic Editors: A. Mankertz and I. Nsahlai

Copyright © 2012 Lucy W. Njagi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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