Table of Contents
ISRN Rehabilitation
Volume 2012, Article ID 284924, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/284924
Review Article

Turning Ability in Stroke Survivors: A Review of Literature

1Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Puncak Alam Campus, 42300 Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
2Rehabilitation Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Sungai Buloh Campus, 47000 Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia
3Basic Science Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Puncak Alam Campus, 42300 Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 28 June 2012; Accepted 2 August 2012

Academic Editors: C.-L. Kao, J. L. Leasure, K.-H. Pantke, and H. Unalan

Copyright © 2012 Haidzir Manaf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore the research literature on the turning ability among stroke survivors. Stroke is one of the top five leading causes of death and disability in Malaysia. Stroke survivors reported a higher rate of fall incidences with turning while walking has been the major contributor in most of the incidences. The attentional task requires stroke survivors to have higher cognitive and attention function, and sound muscle coordination in order to perform multitask activities such as driving, walking and turning while talking, carrying an object (holding a plastic bag), navigating corners and overcoming obstacles within the base of support. Most of the previous studies have focused on the kinematic and gait parameters measurement of turning ability among stroke survivors. However, studies conducted on muscle activity using electromyography to evaluate the time pattern of muscle contraction during turning event is lacking. With regards to dual-task ability among stroke survivors, there is insufficient information or research into dual task (motor and cognitive) ability during turning. Further studies are needed to understand the effects of dual-task activity on muscle activity and gait parameters and how this impairment affects the turning ability. This needs to be addressed in order to prevent falls among stroke survivors.