Table of Contents
ISRN Rehabilitation
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 284924, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/284924
Review Article

Turning Ability in Stroke Survivors: A Review of Literature

1Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Puncak Alam Campus, 42300 Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
2Rehabilitation Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Sungai Buloh Campus, 47000 Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia
3Basic Science Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Puncak Alam Campus, 42300 Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 28 June 2012; Accepted 2 August 2012

Academic Editors: C.-L. Kao, J. L. Leasure, K.-H. Pantke, and H. Unalan

Copyright © 2012 Haidzir Manaf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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