Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2012, Article ID 285748, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/285748
Research Article

Sexual and Asexual Reproduction of Salix sitchensis and the Influence of Beaver (Castor canadensis) Herbivory on Reproductive Success

1Ecosystem Science and Management Program, University of Northern British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, Canada V2N 4Z9
2Biology Department, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 5A3
3School of Environmental Planning, University of Northern British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, Canada V2N 4Z9
4School of Planning, Faculty of Architecture and Planning, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 1000, Halifax, NS, Canada B3J 2X4

Received 12 September 2012; Accepted 8 October 2012

Academic Editors: J. E. Colman, M. A. Molina-Montenegro, J.-P. Rossi, and J. G. Zaller

Copyright © 2012 Travis G. Gerwing et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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