Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 294895, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/294895
Research Article

Prognostic Factors of Short-Term Outcome of Low Back Pain in Patients Attending Health Insurance Clinics in Sharkia Governorate, Egypt

1Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Al-Azhar Faculty of Medicine, Nasr city, Cairo, Egypt
2Department of Family and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Taibah University, Madinah, Saudi Arabia

Received 21 August 2011; Accepted 13 September 2011

Academic Editors: B. Netterstrøm and K. M. Rospenda

Copyright © 2012 Khaled Kasim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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