Table of Contents
ISRN Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 351750, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/351750
Research Article

H19-Promoter-Targeted Therapy Combined with Gemcitabine in the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

1Department of Biological Chemistry, Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904, Israel
2Department of Oncology, Hadassah Medical Center, University Hospital, Jerusalem 91915, Israel
3Department of HPB Surgery “A”, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

Received 11 April 2012; Accepted 1 May 2012

Academic Editors: A. Celetti, S. Chen, B. Fang, F. Kuhnel, and G. Schiavon

Copyright © 2012 Vladimir Sorin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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