Table of Contents
ISRN Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 395952, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/395952
Review Article

Activating Death Receptor DR5 as a Therapeutic Strategy for Rhabdomyosarcoma

1Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
2Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., NCI Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
3Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Received 4 January 2012; Accepted 24 January 2012

Academic Editors: E. Boven and S. Mandruzzato

Copyright © 2012 Zhigang Kang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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