Table of Contents
ISRN Agronomy
Volume 2012, Article ID 456856, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/456856
Research Article

Phenological Development-Yield Relationships in Durum Wheat Cultivars under Late-Season High-Temperature Stress in a Semiarid Environment

Faculty of Agriculture, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan

Received 29 August 2011; Accepted 9 October 2011

Academic Editors: M. Diaz Ravina and Y. Yan

Copyright © 2012 Ghazi N. Al-Karaki. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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