Table of Contents
ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2012, Article ID 480265, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/480265
Research Article

Anti-Inflammatory, Analgesic, and Antipyretic Activities of the Ethanol Extract of Piper interruptum Opiz. and Piper chaba Linn.

1Division of Pharmacology, Department of Preclinical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
2Department of Applied Thai Traditional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Rungsit Campus, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
3Division of Biochemistry, Department of Preclinical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
4Division of Physiology, Department of Preclinical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
5Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
6Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Chiang Mai Rajabhat University, Chiang Mai 50300, Thailand

Received 20 December 2011; Accepted 11 January 2012

Academic Editors: R. Fantozzi and M. van den Buuse

Copyright © 2012 Seewaboon Sireeratawong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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