Table of Contents
ISRN Education
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 501589, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/501589
Review Article

Querying the Causal Role of Attitudes in Educational Attainment

School of Education, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B152TT, UK

Received 13 September 2012; Accepted 16 October 2012

Academic Editors: M. Reis and D. Tudela

Copyright © 2012 Stephen Gorard. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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