Table of Contents
ISRN Emergency Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 508579, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/508579
Research Article

Optimizing Transport Time from Accident to Hospital: When to Drive and When to Fly?

1Department of Anaesthesiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck surgery, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
3Department of Surgery, University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
4Regional Emergency Healthcare Network, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Received 30 August 2012; Accepted 20 September 2012

Academic Editors: C. C. Chang and R. Cirocchi

Copyright © 2012 D. V. Weerheijm et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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