Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 521582, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/521582
Research Article

Selected Metals in Various Fractions of Soil and Fungi in a Swedish Forest

1Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
2Department of Ecology, Zhytomyr State Technological University, 103 Cherniakhovsky Street, 10005 Zhytomyr, Ukraine

Received 14 April 2012; Accepted 11 May 2012

Academic Editors: S. Loppi and P. Rautio

Copyright © 2012 Mykhailo Vinichuk. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The patterns of uptake and distribution of Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in the soil-mycelium-sporocarps compartments in various transfer steps are presented. I attempted to find out whether there is a difference between the uptake of metals from soil to fungi (mycelium/soil ratio) and transport within fungal thalli (sporocarps/mycelium ratio). The concentration of Cu, Zn, and Cd increased in the order bulk soil < soil-root interface (or rhizosphere) < fungal mycelium < fungal sporocarps. The concentration of Co, Ni, and Pb decreased in the order bulk soil (or rhizosphere) < fungal mycelium < soil-root interface < fungal sporocarps. The uptake of Cu, Zn, and Cd during the entire transfer process in natural conditions between soil and sporocarps occurred against a concentration gradient. Mycorrhizal fungi (mycelium and sporocarps) only absorbed Co, Ni, and Pb but did not accumulate these elements in their thalli. Metal accumulation within fungal mycelium biomass in the top forest soil layer (0–5 cm) may account for about 5% of the total amount of Co, 4% Ni, 7% Cu, 8% Zn, 24% Cd, and 3% Pb.