Table of Contents
ISRN Rehabilitation
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 534856, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/534856
Research Article

The Relationship between Acute Functional Status and Long-Term Ambulation after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

1Traumatic Brain Injury Program, McGill University Health Centre (Montreal General Hospital), Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1A4
2Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 0G4
3Social and Preventive Medicine Department, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7
4Department of Neurosurgery, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-1660, USA

Received 1 May 2012; Accepted 29 May 2012

Academic Editors: M. Schmitter-Edgecombe, J. J. Sosnoff, and M. Syczewska

Copyright © 2012 Elaine de Guise et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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