Table of Contents
ISRN Microbiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 538694, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/538694
Review Article

Candida albicans: A Model Organism for Studying Fungal Pathogens

1Molecular Genetics Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut 673601, Kerala, India
2Biomedical Engineering Option, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80204, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
3Department of Biological & Environmental Sciences, Alabama A & M University, Normal, AL 35762, USA

Received 29 July 2012; Accepted 30 August 2012

Academic Editors: H. Asakura, G. Koraimann, and J. Theron

Copyright © 2012 M. Anaul Kabir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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