Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2012, Article ID 539397, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/539397
Research Article

Pesticide Concentrations in Vacuum Dust from Farm Homes: Variation between Planting and Nonplanting Seasons

1Department of Public Health, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101, USA
2National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4676 Columbia Parkway MS R-14, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA
3Department of Epidemiology, University of Kentucky College of Public Health, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
4Center for Public Health Research and Evaluation, Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201, USA

Received 27 October 2011; Accepted 30 November 2011

Academic Editors: I. Szadkowska-Stanczyk and G. Truchon

Copyright © 2012 Vijay Golla et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. EPA, Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage: 2000 and 2001 Market Estimates, Office of Pesticide Programs, Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, USA, 2001.
  2. M. C. R. Alavanja, D. P. Sandler, S. B. McMaster et al., “The agricultural health study,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 104, no. 4, pp. 362–369, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. R. G. Lewis, C. R. Fortune, F. T. Blanchard, and D. E. Camann, “Movement and deposition of two organophosphorus pesticides within a residence after interior and exterior applications,” Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 339–351, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. B. Eskenazi, A. Bradman, and R. Castorina, “Exposures of children to organophosphate pesticides and their potential adverse health effects,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 107, no. 3, pp. 409–419, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. J. J. Quackenboss, E. D. Pellizzari, P. Shubat et al., “Design strategy for assessing multi-pathway exposure for children: the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES),” Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 145–158, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. A. Bradman, M. E. Harnly, W. Draper et al., “Pesticide exposures to children from California's Central Valley: results of a pilot study,” Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 217–234, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. D. E. Camann, G. G. Akland, J. D. Buckley, A. E. Bond, and D. T. Mage, “Carpet dust and pesticide exposure of farm children,” in Proceedings of the International Society of Experimental Analysis Annual Meeting, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, November 1997.
  8. N. J. Simcox, R. A. Fenske, S. A. Wolz, I. C. Lee, and D. A. Kalman, “Pesticides in household dust and soil: exposure pathways for children of agricultural families,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 103, no. 12, pp. 1126–1134, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  9. R. A. Fenske, J. C. Kissel, C. Lu et al., “Biologically based pesticide dose estimates for children in an agricultural community,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 108, no. 6, pp. 515–520, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. R. A. Fenske, C. Lu, J. Kissel et al., “Pesticide exposure of children in agricultural communities: exposure pathways and biologically based dose estimates,” Program and Abstracts, Agricultural Safety and Health in a New Century, Cooperstown, NY, USA, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  11. L. Mott, D. Fore, J. Curtis, and G. Solomon, “NRDC reports: our children at risk: the 5 worst environmental threats to their health,” Tech. Rep., NRDC, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  12. M. G. Nishioka, R. G. Lewis, M. C. Brinkman, H. M. Burkholder, C. E. Hines, and J. R. Menkedick, “Distribution of 2,4-D in air and on surfaces inside residences after lawn applications: comparing exposure estimates from various media for young children,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 109, no. 11, pp. 1185–1191, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. C. L. Curl, R. A. Fenske, J. C. Kissel et al., “Evaluation of take-home organophosphorus pesticide exposure among agricultural workers and their children,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 110, no. 12, pp. A787–A792, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. S. J. Reynolds, J. A. Merchant, A. M. Stromquist et al., “Keokuk county Iowa rural health study: self-reported use of pesticides and protective equipment,” Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health, pp. 67–77, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. J. S. Colt, S. H. Zahm, D. E. Camann, and P. Hartge, “Comparison of pesticides and other compounds in carpet dust samples collected from used vacuum cleaner bags and from a high-volume surface sampler,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 106, no. 11, pp. 721–724, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. R. G. Lewis, R. C. Fortmann, and D. E. Camann, “Evaluation of methods for monitoring the potential exposure of small children to pesticides in the residential environment,” Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 37–46, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. B. D. Curwin, M. J. Hein, W. T. Sanderson et al., “Pesticide contamination inside farm and nonfarm homes,” Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, vol. 2, no. 7, pp. 357–367, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. B. Curwin, W. Sanderson, S. Reynolds, M. Hein, and M. Alavanja, “Pesticide use and practices in an Iowa farm family pesticide exposure study,” Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 423–433, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. P. J. Lioy, R. D. Edwards, N. Freeman et al., “House dust levels of selected insecticides and a herbicide measured by the EL and LWW samplers and comparisons to hand rinses and urine metabolites,” Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 327–340, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. ASTM, “Standard Practice for the collection of floor dust for chemical analysis,” Standard Practice D5438-00, American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, Pa, USA, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  21. B. D. Curwin, M. J. Hein, W. T. Sanderson et al., “Urinary pesticide concentrations among children, mothers and fathers living in farm and non-farm households in Iowa,” Annals of Occupational Hygiene, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 53–65, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. C. T. Ramwell, P. D. Johnson, A. B. A. Boxall, and D. A. Rimmer, “Pesticide residues on the external surfaces of field crop sprayers: occupational exposure,” Annals of Occupational Hygiene, vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 345–350, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus