Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 581725, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/581725
Review Article

Unveiling New Molecular Factors Useful for Detection of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease due to Chlamydia trachomatis Infection

1Dermatology Department, CHUVI and University of Vigo, 36210 Vigo, Spain
2Predoctoral Researcher in Health Sciences, University of Vigo, 36210 Vigo, Spain
3Analytical Chemistry Department, University of Vigo, 36210 Vigo, Spain
4Department of Molecular Biology, Centre for Molecular and Cellular Studies, Lugo, Spain

Received 5 August 2012; Accepted 31 August 2012

Academic Editors: J.-L. Pouly, S. San Martin, and K. Yang

Copyright © 2012 Carmen Rodriguez-Cerdeira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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