Table of Contents
ISRN Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 725827, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/725827
Research Article

Early-Stage Thinning for the Restoration of Young Redwood—Douglas-Fir Forests in Northern Coastal California, USA

1USDA Forest Service, Fremont/Winema National Forests, Supervisor's Office, 1301 South G Street, Lakeview, OR 97630, USA
2Department of Forest Management, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
3Department of Forestry and Wildland Resources, Humboldt State University, Harpst Street, Arcata, CA 95521-8299, USA

Received 17 October 2011; Accepted 23 November 2011

Academic Editor: A. Bortolus

Copyright © 2012 Jesse F. Plummer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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