Table of Contents
ISRN Education
Volume 2012, Article ID 731072, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/731072
Research Article

Decentralization and School Management in Namibia: The Ideologies of Education Bureaucrats in Implementing Government Policies

1National Institute for Educational Development, Ministry of Education, Okahandja 9000, Namibia
2Department of Education Management and Policy Studies, Faculty of Education, Groenkloof Campus, University of Pretoria, P.O. Box 20, Hatfield 0028, South Africa

Received 3 January 2012; Accepted 6 March 2012

Academic Editors: D. M. Hoffman and J. Pedulla

Copyright © 2012 Hertha Pomuti and Everard Weber. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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