Table of Contents
ISRN Molecular Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 738718, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/738718
Review Article

Autophagy: New Questions from Recent Answers

Department of Cell Biology and Institute of Biomembranes, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Received 12 November 2012; Accepted 27 November 2012

Academic Editors: T. Hellwig-Bürgel, A. J. Molenaar, and A. Montecucco

Copyright © 2012 Fulvio Reggiori. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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