Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 748080, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/748080
Research Article

Risk Perceptions of Environmental Hazards and Human Reproduction: A Community-Based Survey

1School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
2Centre for Public Health and Population Health Research, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
3Occupational and Environmental Health Research Group, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
4Epidemiology Research Programme, Centre for Public Health and Population Health Research, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK

Received 2 September 2011; Accepted 25 September 2011

Academic Editor: M. Zmyslony

Copyright © 2012 Ashley Shepherd et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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