Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2012, Article ID 802649, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/802649
Research Article

Evaluation of the Effects of Sativex (THC BDS: CBD BDS) on Inhibition of Spasticity in a Chronic Relapsing Experimental Allergic Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: A Model of Multiple Sclerosis

1GW Pharmaceutical PLc, Porton Down Science Park, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ, UK
2Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London E1 2AT, UK

Received 3 April 2012; Accepted 12 July 2012

Academic Editors: H. Aizawa and A. Karni

Copyright © 2012 A. Hilliard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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