Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2012, Article ID 854237, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/854237
Clinical Study

CD8 T-Cell Responses in Incident and Prevalent Human Papillomavirus Types 16 and 18 Infections

1Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Slot 502, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
2Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 3333 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
3Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China

Received 2 November 2011; Accepted 14 December 2011

Academic Editors: Y. S. Song and L. C. Zeferino

Copyright © 2012 Hannah N. Coleman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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