Table of Contents
ISRN Allergy
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 868170, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/868170
Research Article

Effect of Activated Charcoal Fibers on the Survival of the House Dust Mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus: A Pilot Study

1Division of Infectious Diseases and Allergy, Soonchunghyang Medical Research Institute, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan 330-090, Republic of Korea
2Department of Clinical Parasitology, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan 330-090, Republic of Korea
3Department of Dermatology, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan 330-090, Republic of Korea
4Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan 330-090, Republic of Korea
5Wellington Asthma Research Group, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Otago, Wellington 6242, New Zealand

Received 22 August 2012; Accepted 8 October 2012

Academic Editors: G. Di Lorenzo and B. M. Stadler

Copyright © 2012 Hae-Seon Nam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

House dust mites produce potent allergens that exacerbate asthma in sensitized patients, whom are recommended to practice allergen avoidance within their home environment. We tested the effect of activated charcoal impregnated fibers on house dust mite survival. One hundred live adult house dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) were added to eight culture dishes preequilibrated at room temperature ( ) and 70% humidity ( ) containing house dust mite food and active charcoal fibers. At 10 minute intervals, live and dead house dust mites were counted. All house dust mites instantly attached to the activated charcoal fibers and started to shrink almost immediately. There were no live house dust mites present as early as 40 minutes in some dishes while after 190 minutes all house dust mites were dead. In conclusion, activated charcoal fibers, if incorporated into bedding items, have the potential to control house dust mites in the indoor environment.