Table of Contents
ISRN Vascular Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 901801, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/901801
Research Article

Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS3) +894 G>T Associates with Physical Activity and Muscle Performance among Young Adults

1Department of Kinesiology & Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
2Department of Health Professions, Center for Lifestyle Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
3Department of Kinesiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
5School of Health and Human Performance, Centre for Preventive Medicine, Dublin City University, Dublin, Dublin 9, Ireland
6School of Health Sciences, Exercise Science Division, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859, USA
7Department of Exercise Science and Health Promotion, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA
8Department of Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT 06106, USA
9Center for Genetic Medicine Research, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010, USA

Received 4 September 2012; Accepted 5 October 2012

Academic Editors: D. Guidolin, T. Malinski, C. Maziere, and C.-C. Wu

Copyright © 2012 Margaux A. Guidry et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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