Table of Contents
ISRN Vascular Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 930913, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/930913
Research Article

Mild External Compression of the Leg Increases Skin and Muscle Microvascular Blood Flow and Muscle Oxygenation during Simulated Venous Hypertension

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California-San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093, USA
2Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Per Dubbsgatan 14, 6tr, 413 46 Göteborg, Sweden

Received 6 November 2012; Accepted 22 November 2012

Academic Editors: A. Hirata, A. Suzuki, and Y. Tohno

Copyright © 2012 T. B. Neuschwander et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We studied the effect of mild external leg compression on both skin and muscle microvascular flow, and muscle oxygenation in the leg of healthy subjects during simulated venous hypertension. Skin and muscle microvascular blood flows were measured using photoplethysmography (PPG), and muscle oxygenation was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Both PPG and NIRS probes were placed over the anterior compartment of the right leg in 8 healthy subjects. Measurements were taken under three experimental conditions: external leg compression (40 mmHg); simulated venous hypertension (65 mmHg thigh cuff); external leg compression during simulated venous hypertension. Muscle oxygenation was measured only under external leg compression during simulated venous hypertension. Simulated venous hypertension decreased skin and muscle microvascular blood flows from 100% (baseline) to % and % ( ), respectively. External leg compression during simulated venous hypertension caused 2-fold increases in both skin and muscle microvascular blood flows compared to simulated venous hypertension ( ). Similarly, external leg compression during simulated venous hypertension significantly restored muscle oxygenation by % compared to its baseline ( ). Our results demonstrate that mild external leg compression counteracts the decreases in skin microvascular flow, muscle microvascular flow, and muscle oxygenation induced by simulated venous hypertension in the leg.