Table of Contents
ISRN Education
Volume 2012, Article ID 934941, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/934941
Research Article

Challenges of Becoming a Scholar: A Study of Doctoral Students' Problems and Well-Being

1Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 9, Siltavuorenpenger 5A, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
2Department of Teacher Education, Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 9, Siltavuorenpenger 5A, 00014 Helsinki, Finland

Received 3 April 2012; Accepted 29 April 2012

Academic Editors: M. Recker and N. L. Snyder

Copyright © 2012 Kirsi Pyhältö et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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