Table of Contents
ISRN Ophthalmology
Volume 2012, Article ID 968493, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/968493
Research Article

Inhibitory Effects of Trehalose on Malignant Melanoma Cell Growth: Implications for a Novel Topical Anticancer Agent on the Ocular Surface

Department of Opthalmology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, 5 Zaifu-cho, Hirosaki 036-8562, Japan

Received 17 September 2012; Accepted 18 October 2012

Academic Editors: S. Jonuscheit and A. V. Ljubimov

Copyright © 2012 Takashi Kudo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. J. H. Crowe, F. A. Hoekstra, and L. M. Crowe, “Anhydrobiosis,” Annual Review of Physiology, vol. 54, pp. 579–599, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. R. J. Mayer and D. J. Candy, “Changes in energy reserves during flight of the desert locust, schistocerca gregaria,” Comparative Biochemistry And Physiology, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 409–418, 1969. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. S. B. Leslie, E. Israeli, B. Lighthart, J. H. Crowe, and L. M. Crowe, “Trehalose and sucrose protect both membranes and proteins in intact bacteria during drying,” Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 61, no. 10, pp. 3592–3597, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. N. Guo, I. Puhlev, D. R. Brown, J. Mansbridge, and F. Levine, “Trehalose expression confers desiccation tolerance on human cells,” Nature Biotechnology, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 168–171, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. T. Nakamura, E. Sekiyama, M. Takaoka et al., “The use of trehalose-treated freeze-dried amniotic membrane for ocular surface reconstruction,” Biomaterials, vol. 29, no. 27, pp. 3729–3737, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. T. Matsuo, Y. Tsuchida, and N. Morimoto, “Trehalose eye drops in the treatment of dry eye syndrome,” Ophthalmology, vol. 109, no. 11, pp. 2024–2029, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. M. Tanaka, Y. Machida, S. Niu et al., “Trehalose alleviates polyglutamine-mediated pathology in a mouse model of Huntington disease,” Nature Medicine, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 148–154, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. T. Matsuo, “Trehalose versus hyaluronan or cellulose in eyedrops for the treatment of dry eye,” Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 48, no. 4, pp. 321–327, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. K. Takeuchi, M. Nakazawa, Y. Ebina et al., “Inhibitory effects of trehalose on fibroblast proliferation and implications for ocular surgery,” Experimental Eye Research, vol. 91, no. 5, pp. 567–577, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. K. Takeuchi, M. Nakazawa, and Y. Ebina, “Effects of trehalose on VEGF-stimulated angiogenesis and myofibroblast proliferation: implications for glaucoma filtration surgery,” Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 52, no. 9, pp. 6987–6993, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. Y. Kitazawa, K. Kawase, H. Matsushita, and M. Minobe, “Trabeculectomy with mitomycin: a comparative study with fluorouracil,” Archives of Ophthalmology, vol. 109, no. 12, pp. 1693–1698, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. Y. Kitazawa, H. Suemori-Matsushita, T. Yamamoto, and K. Kawase, “Low-dose and high-dose mitomycin trabeculectomy as an initial surgery in primary open-angle glaucoma,” Ophthalmology, vol. 100, no. 11, pp. 1624–1628, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. R. Sihota, T. Dada, S. D. Gupta, S. Sharma, R. Arora, and H. C. Agarwal, “Conjunctival dysfunction and mitomycin C-induced hypotony,” Journal of Glaucoma, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 392–397, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. A. Solomon, U. Ticho, and J. Frucht-Pery, “Late-onset, bleb-associated endophthalmitis following glaucoma filtering surgery with or without antifibrotic agents,” Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 283–293, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. E. J. Poulsen and R. Rand Allingham, “Characteristics and risk factors of infections after glaucoma filtering surgery,” Journal of Glaucoma, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 438–443, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. D. S. Greenfield and R. K. Parrish, “Bleb rupture following filtering surgery with mitomycin-C: clinicopathologic correlations,” Ophthalmic Surgery and Lasers, vol. 27, no. 10, pp. 876–877, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. D. A. Belyea, J. A. Dan, R. L. Stamper, M. F. Lieberman, and W. H. Spencer, “Late onset of sequential multifocal bleb leaks after glaucoma filtration surgery with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C,” American Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 124, no. 1, pp. 40–45, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. P. W. DeBry, T. W. Perkins, G. Heatley, P. Kaufman, and L. C. Brumback, “Incidence of late-onset bleb-related complications following trabeculectomy with mitomycin,” Archives of Ophthalmology, vol. 120, no. 3, pp. 297–300, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. B. P. Bouchet, C. Caron de Fronmentel, A. Puisleux, and C. M. Galmarini, “P53 as a target of anti-cancer drug development,” Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, vol. 53, pp. 190–207, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  20. T. H. Stracker, T. Usui, and J. H. J. Petrini, “Taking the time to make important decisions: the checkpoint effector kinases Chk1 and Chk2 and the DNA damage response,” DNA Repair, vol. 8, no. 9, pp. 1047–1054, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. S. Shangary, D. Qin, D. McEachern et al., “Temporal activation of p53 by a specific MDM2 inhibitor is selectively toxic to tumors and leads to complete tumor growth inhibition,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 105, no. 10, pp. 3933–3938, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. J. S. Fridman and S. W. Lowe, “Control of apoptosis by p53,” Oncogene, vol. 22, no. 56, pp. 9030–9040, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. H. C. Reinhardt and M. B. Yaffe, “Kinases that control the cell cycle in response to DNA damage: Chk1, Chk2, and MK2,” Current Opinion in Cell Biology, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 245–255, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. F. Uhlmann, C. Bouchoux, and S. López-Avilés, “A quantitative model for cyclin-dependent kinase control of the cell cycle: revisited,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, vol. 366, no. 1584, pp. 3572–3583, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. A. Baldi, A. DeLuca, V. Esposito, M. Camprioni, E. P. Spugnini, and G. Citro, “Tumor suppressors and cell-cycle proteins in lung cancer,” Pathology Research International, vol. 2011, Article ID 605042, 12 pages, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  26. U. Strausfeld, A. Fernandez, J. P. Capony et al., “Activation of p34(cdc2) protein kinase by microinjection of human cdc25C into mammalian cells. Requirement for prior phosphorylation of cdc25C by p34(cdc2) on sites phosphorylated at mitosis,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 269, no. 8, pp. 5989–6000, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus