Table of Contents
ISRN Pediatrics
Volume 2012, Article ID 976206, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/976206
Research Article

The Association between EEG Abnormality and Behavioral Disorder: Developmental Delay in Phenylketonuria

1Pediatric Neurology, Pediatric Neurology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (SBMU), Tehran, Iran
2Pediatric Endocrinology, Pediatric Neurology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (SBMU), Tehran, Iran
3Pediatric Neurology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (SBMU), Tehran, Iran

Received 20 December 2011; Accepted 24 January 2012

Academic Editors: G. Deda and A. Maheshwari

Copyright © 2012 Parvaneh Karimzadeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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