Table of Contents
ISRN Education
Volume 2013, Article ID 108705, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/108705
Review Article

Neoliberalism, the Knowledge Economy, and the Learner: Challenging the Inevitability of the Commodified Self as an Outcome of Education

School of Education, University of Glasgow, St. Andrew’s Building, 11 Eldon Street, Glasgow G3 6NH, UK

Received 28 February 2013; Accepted 4 April 2013

Academic Editors: T. A. Betts, T. Carvalho, and R. Pasnak

Copyright © 2013 Fiona Patrick. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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