Table of Contents
ISRN Public Health
Volume 2013, Article ID 127365, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/127365
Review Article

Extreme Weather Events and Mental Health: Tackling the Psychosocial Challenge

Amity Institute of Behavioral and Allied Sciences, Amity University, Lucknow 226010, India

Received 24 May 2013; Accepted 12 June 2013

Academic Editors: E. Clays, S. M. Pezzotto, and I. Szadkowska-Stanczyk

Copyright © 2013 Jyotsana Shukla. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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