Table of Contents
ISRN Neuroscience
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 152567, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/152567
Research Article

Trigeminal Medullary Dorsal Horn Neurons Activated by Nasal Stimulation Coexpress AMPA, NMDA, and NK1 Receptors

Department of Physiology, Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine, Midwestern University, 555 31st Street, Downers Grove, IL 60515, USA

Received 16 August 2013; Accepted 7 October 2013

Academic Editors: A. Almeida and M. Chacur

Copyright © 2013 P. F. McCulloch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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