Table of Contents
ISRN Neurology
Volume 2013, Article ID 159184, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/159184
Research Article

Motor Skill Training Promotes Sensorimotor Recovery and Increases Microtubule-Associated Protein-2 (MAP-2) Immunoreactivity in the Motor Cortex after Intracerebral Hemorrhage in the Rat

1Post Graduate Programme in Neuroscience, Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2Physiotherapy Department, Federal University of Health Sciences of Porto Alegre, UFCSPA, Rua Sarmento Leite 245, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Faculty of Nursing, Nutrition and Physiotherapy, PUCRS, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
4Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 10 April 2013; Accepted 15 May 2013

Academic Editors: P. Annunziata, T. den Heijer, P. Giannakopoulos, Y. Ohyagi, E. M. Wassermann, and S. Weis

Copyright © 2013 M. V. Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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