Table of Contents
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2013, Article ID 178415, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/178415
Research Article

An Analysis of the NSW Midwives Data Collection over an 11-Year Period to Determine the Risks to the Mother and the Neonate of Induced Delivery for Non-Obstetric Indication at Term

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW, Australia

Received 1 July 2013; Accepted 18 August 2013

Academic Editors: M. Friedrich and G. Rizzo

Copyright © 2013 Padmini Raviraj et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To determine the risks of induced term delivery to the mother and neonate at different gestational ages in the absence of obstetric indications. Study Design. All deliveries in New South Wales (NSW) between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed from the MDC. Uncomplicated pregnancies which were induced for non-obstetric reasons after 37 completed weeks were reviewed. This was a retrospective, historical cohort study, and both maternal and neonatal outcomes were analysed and compared between different gestational age groups. Results. An analysis of the data shows that induction of labour after 37 completed weeks exposes the fetus and mother to different levels of risk at different gestations. Conclusion. In an uncomplicated pregnancy, induction of labour is associated with the highest rate of neonatal complication at 37 weeks as compared with rates at later gestations. With each ensuing week, the neonatal outcome improves. At 40 weeks the likelihood of neonatal intensive care admission, low Apgar scores, and perinatal death rate is at its lowest, and then there is a slight but not significant rise after 41 weeks. The likelihood of caesarean section is the lowest when inductions are carried out at 39 weeks and is the highest at 41 weeks and over.