Table of Contents
ISRN Geriatrics
Volume 2013, Article ID 194693, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/194693
Research Article

Development of a Masticatory Indicator Using a Checklist of Chewable Food Items for the Community-Dwelling Elderly

1Community Healthcare, National Institute of Public Health of Japan, Minami 2-3-6, Saitama, Wako-shi 351-0197, Japan
2Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Komazawa Women’s University, 238 Sakahama, Inagi-shi, Tokyo 206-8511, Japan
3Faculty of Health Sciences, Kyushu University of Health and Welfare, 1714-1 Yoshino-cho, Miyazaki, Nobeoka-shi 882-8508, Japan
4Faculty of Social Welfare, Kyushu University of Health and Welfare, 1714-1 Yoshino-cho, Miyazaki, Nobeoka-shi 882-8508, Japan
5Faculty of Nursing Science, University of KinDAI Himeji, 2042-2 Oshio, Hyogo, Himeji-shi 671-0101, Japan

Received 27 November 2012; Accepted 12 December 2012

Academic Editors: D. Chan, A. Gentili, and D. Orsucci

Copyright © 2013 Hiroko Miura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to develop a new assessment scale to evaluate masticatory ability among community-dwelling elderly individuals. The study comprised 761 independent elderly subjects residing in the community. We pooled 25 food items with various textures. Based upon the pass rate and nonresponse rate, we extracted 9 food items to be included in the masticatory ability assessment for the community-dwelling elderly (MACE). The reliability of this assessment was determined using Cronbach’s alpha coefficients. We then examined the concurrent validity of the MACE by comparing it with an existing method termed “mastication score.” Additionally, the convergent validity was examined by comparing the correlation coefficients of MACE, general oral health assessment index (GOHAI), and the number of teeth. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of MACE was 0.89 ( ), indicating satisfactory reliability. MACE was significantly correlated with the mastication score ( ), GOHAI ( ), and the number of teeth ( ). These results suggest that MACE is a useful tool with sufficient reliability and validity to identify declines in masticatory ability among community-dwelling elderly individuals.