Table of Contents
ISRN Forestry
Volume 2013, Article ID 298735, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/298735
Review Article

An Overview of Indian Forestry Sector with REDD+ Approach

Institute of Environmental Studies, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana, India

Received 27 May 2013; Accepted 29 June 2013

Academic Editors: K. Kielland and G. Martinez Pastur

Copyright © 2013 Vandana Sharma and Smita Chaudhry. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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