Table of Contents
ISRN Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 329606, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/329606
Review Article

Insulin Resistance and Muscle Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease

Renal Division, Emory University School of Medicine, Woodruff Memorial Research Building, Room 338, 1639 Pierce Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Received 23 December 2012; Accepted 21 January 2013

Academic Editors: Y. Combarnous and J. E. Gunton

Copyright © 2013 James L. Bailey. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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