Table of Contents
ISRN Critical Care
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 347346, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2013/347346
Research Article

Comparing Drug-Drug Interaction Severity Ratings between Bedside Clinicians and Proprietary Databases

1Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit and Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
2Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics and Critical Care Medicine, Clinical Translational Science Institute and School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacoinformatics and Outcomes Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
3Department of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
4Medical Intensive Care Unit and Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
5Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
6Surgical Intensive Care Unit and Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA

Received 20 September 2012; Accepted 16 October 2012

Academic Editors: F. Cavaliere, A. M. Japiassu, D. Makris, and A. K. Mankan

Copyright © 2013 Michael J. Armahizer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. The purpose of this project was to compare DDI severity for clinician opinion in the context of the patient’s clinical status to the severity of proprietary databases. Methods. This was a single-center, prospective evaluation of DDIs at a large, tertiary care academic medical center in a 10-bed cardiac intensive care unit (CCU). A pharmacist identified DDIs using two proprietary databases. The physicians and pharmacists caring for the patients evaluated the DDIs for severity while incorporating their clinical knowledge of the patient. Results. A total of 61 patients were included in the evaluation and experienced 769 DDIs. The most common DDIs included: aspirin/clopidogrel, aspirin/insulin, and aspirin/furosemide. Pharmacists ranked the DDIs identically 73.8% of the time, compared to the physicians who agreed 42.2% of the time. Pharmacists agreed with the more severe proprietary database scores for 14.8% of DDIs versus physicians at 7.3%. Overall, clinicians agreed with the proprietary database 20.6% of the time while clinicians ranked the DDIs lower than the database 77.3% of the time. Conclusions. Proprietary DDI databases generally label DDIs with a higher severity rating than bedside clinicians. Developing a DDI knowledgebase for CDSS requires consideration of the severity information source and should include the clinician.